RADIOLOGY

The Radiology Department at SCHD#1 is able to offer a wide variety of services to assist your physician in diagnosing your condition.

TESTING

Where do my results come from?
Once images are obtained, a board certified Radiologist will interpret the images. A formal report is then generated and automatically sent to your physician’s office. Copies of reports are also sent to any additional physicians involved in your care as requested by you or your doctor.
What if I have questions about my test results?
If you have questions about the interpretation of your images, please understand that our imaging staff are not permitted to, nor qualified, to interpret any imaging results. Therefore, it is best for you to contact your ordering provider for an explanation on how these results may be used to care for you.
How do I request a copy of my results?
We would be happy to provide you a copy of your images. Please call 620-845-6496 or come  by and fill out a release of information for the images and we can provide them on a disc at your request. However, please provide 24 hour notice on ALL image requests.

HOURS

General Radiography
General x-rays are available Monday - Friday 7am to 5pm. The department is staffed on call 24 hours a day, seven days a week for Emergency needs.

Radiology Manager

Judi Fink

COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY
(CT SCAN)

 

Computerized Axial Technologies (CAT scanning) are available Monday - Friday 7am-5pm. This department is also staffed on call 24 hours a day, seven days a week for emergency needs.

CT scans produce detailed images of internal organs by using a type of sophisticated x-ray device. The CT scan can show details of organs that are not seen in traditional x-rays. This aids physicians in diagnosing disease, viewing internal abnormalities, and assessing the extent of trauma.

CT scans are painless and, with newer machines, take only a few minutes. Typically, the whole procedure takes about 15-30 minutes. Radiation from a CT scan is much higher than a traditional x-ray, but the information gained is also much greater.

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During the CT scan

CT scanners are shaped like a large doughnut standing on its side. You lie on a narrow, motorized table that slides through the opening. Straps and pillows may be used to hep you stay in position. During a head scan, the table may be fitted with a special cradle that holds your head still.

While the table moves you into the scanner, detectors and the x-ray tube rotate around you. Each rotation yields several images of thing slices of your body. You may hear buzzing, clicking and whirring noises.

A technologist in a separate room can see and hear you. You will be able to communicate with the technologist via intercom. The technologist may ask you to hold your breath at certain points to avoid blurring the images.

Contrast Material

A special dye called a contrast material is needed for some CT scans, to help highlight the areas of your body being examined. The contrast material blocks x-rays and appears white on images, which can help emphasize blood vessels, intestines or other structures.

Contrast material might be given to you:

By mouth: if your esophagus or stomach is being scanned, you may need to swallow a liquid that contains contrast material. This drink may taste slightly unpleasant.
By injection: contrast agents can be injected through a vein in your arm to help your gallbladder, urinary tract, liver or blood vessels stand out on the images. You may experience a feeling of warmth during the injection or a metallic taste in your mouth.

How to Prepare

Depending on the location being scanned, patients maybe asked to remove some or all clothing and wear a hospital gown as well as remove all metal objects, ie: a belt, eyeglasses, jewelry, or dentures. It is also recommended that you do not eat or drink for a few hours before most scans.

After the CT Scan

After the scan you can return to your normal routine. You'll likely be told to drink lots of fluid to help your kidneys remove the contrast material from your body if it was necessary.

Results

CT images are stored as electronic data files and are reviewed on a computer screen. A radiologist interprets these images and sends a written report to your doctor.

ALL EXAMS REQUIRE A WRITTEN ORDER FROM A PHYSICIAN. WE WILL ACCEPT ORDERS FROM PHYSICIANS IN GOOD STANDING AND LICENSED TO PRACTICE MEDICINE IN THE STATES OF KANSAS AND OKLAHOMA.

DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY
(X-RAY)

 
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X-rays are available Monday - Friday 7am-5pm. This department is also staffed on call 24 hours a day, seven days a week for emergency needs.

An x-ray image is produced when a small amount of radiation passes through the body. The ability of x-rays to penetrate tissues and bones varies according to its composition and mass, which allow doctors to obtain images from inside the body.

There is no common preparation for an x-ray. But, it is common that a patient may be asked to put on a gown due to metal on their clothing.

ALL EXAMS REQUIRE A WRITTEN ORDER FROM A PHYSICIAN. WE WILL ACCEPT ORDERS FROM PHYSICIANS IN GOOD STANDING AND LICENSED TO PRACTICE MEDICINE IN THE STATES OF KANSAS AND OKLAHOMA.

MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING
(MRI & MRA)

 

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is available Thursday by appointment only.


MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) is a powerful and versatile diagnostic modality that is widely utilized in the medical field. MRI is a minimally invasive and does not employ ionizing radiation. MRI works with the hydrogen atoms within the body to demonstrate anatomy and pathology and can be acquired in multi-planar acquisitions to, in theory, present the body in three-dimensional detail.


MRI utilizes a very large magnet (and computers) to collect and present information that can be used to diagnose many different conditions and/or diseases. “Manipulation of the parameters” allow for a variety of ways to view the contrast of structures that can aid in diagnosis.


MRI continues to advance in diagnostic ability with the continued introduction of advanced techniques. Faster scan times have enabled MRI to perform imaging of the structures of the abdomen, chest, heart, and blood vessels- in addition to some of the more common neurological and musculoskeletal applications.

Patient instructions

Arrival time: Patients should arrive 5-10 minutes prior to their scheduled exam time to allow for registration and completion of signing insurance and treatment forms.


Clothing: Metal free clothing is requested, sweat clothes work the best if they have no metallic components or decorations. Patients may be asked to remove hearing aids and dentures.


Piercings: All body piercings must be removed before entry into the magnet room for all exams. This must be done for all exams to reduce the possibility of burning while in the magnet.


Valuables: Patients should leave all valuables with a family member, or locked in their vehicles whenever possible. If something must be brought to the scanner, a lock box or cabinet is provided and the key is left in the control room until the patient is finished.


Prep: There is generally no prep for MRI exams. The exception to this will be abdominal exams. These patients should be NPO (not eat or drink anything) for 4 hours before the scan.

MRI Procedure

Patients having an MRI can be quite apprehensive for a number of different reasons. Patient education and understanding can help insure a positive experience.


MRI patients are required to complete and sign an approved MRI patient screening form before entry into the magnet room or the scanner. This screening addresses the many safety issues that are associated with MRI.


MRI scans require patients to hold still for long periods of time - 20-40 minutes. Patient comfort is very important. Patients are made as comfortable as possible when they are positioned on the table, this includes a knee cushion if possible (depending on the area to be scanned), a pillow, blankets, earplugs and a patient alert button that will summon the scanning personnel at all times. There is also verbal communication via an intercom system when the scanner is not scanning.


Patients enter the scanner head first for most exams of anatomy above the waist and feet first for most exams for anatomy below the waist.


Upon completion of the MRI exam, patients will be released from the scanner and escorted back into the hospital. There are no known long term effects from MRI or MRI contrast so patients can return to their normal daily routine upon release.


ALL EXAMS REQUIRE A WRITTEN ORDER FROM A PHYSICIAN. WE WILL ACCEPT ORDERS FROM PHYSICIANS IN GOOD STANDING AND LICENSED TO PRACTICE MEDICINE IN THE STATES OF KANSAS AND OKLAHOMA.

 

ULTRASOUND

Ultrasound & Doppler are available Monday - Thursday by appointment only.


Ultrasound or Sonography, is a non-invasive procedure that uses high frequency sound waves to create images. During ultrasound, a technician moves a small device on the skin. The device transmits signals that a computer converts into moving images. The image is displayed on a computer screen.


There are many uses for ultrasound including viewing a developing fetus, abdominal organ, thyroid, prostate, heart function and blood flow through major vessels.

Preparing for Ultrasound

Gallbladder/Liver Ultrasound: Nothing to eat or drink after midnight the night before your schedules exam and also the morning of your ultrasound until your sonogram is complete. This exam should take approximately 30 mintes to complete.
Abdominal Ultrasound: Nothing to eat or drink after midnight, the night before your scheduled exam until your sonogram is complete. This exam should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.


Pelvic Ultrasound: The bladder is used as a window so it is very important the bladder be as full as possible. You will need to drink 4-6 8 oz glasses of fluids starting 1 hour before your scheduled exam time. You will need to avoid urination until your ultrasound is complete.


Thyroid Ultrasound: No prep is needed.
Prostate/Testicular Ultrasound: No prep is needed.
Breast Ultrasound: No prep is needed.
Renal Ultrasound: Nothing to eat after midnight but patient should be well hydrated, so drinking liquids the morning of your exam is good. If your appointment is in the afternoon, an early light breakfast is permissible and drink liquids for hydration.

Preparing for a Doppler

Carotid Doppler: No prep is needed
Venous & Arterial Doppler: No prep is needed
Echocardiogram: No prep is needed
Renal Doppler: You will need to take 30 mL of Milk of Magnesia the day before your scheduled examination. If you do not have any results within 6 hours repeat with another 30 mL of Milk of Magnesia. Do not eat or drink after midnight the night before your exam until your examination is complete. Your doppler will take approximately 1 hour to complete.
ALL EXAMS REQUIRE A WRITTEN ORDER FROM A PHYSICIAN. WE WILL ACCEPT ORDERS FROM PHYSICIANS IN GOOD STANDING AND LICENSED TO PRACTICE MEDICINE IN THE STATES OF KANSAS AND OKLAHOMA.

DEXA - BONE DENSITY

 
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Bone Density Scans are available Monday - Friday 7am-5pm. You can schedule an appointment by calling the X-ray department at 620-845-6496.


A DEXA scan measures your bone density with a low dose of radiation, which is interpreted by sophisticated computer analysis. Your test results will assist your physician in determining the need for treatment of bone loss.

What to expect during your scan

A Bone densitometry exam is simple and painless. You'll lie down on a padded table, relax, be as still as possible and breathe normally while a mechanical arm passes above your hip and spine. The entire process takes about 20 minutes.

How to Prepare

Wear a comfortable two-piece outfit… without metal zippers, snaps, or under-wire bras. Bone densitometry should be scheduled at least a week after any procedure involving barium (upper GI, small bowel series, barium enema, or abdominal CT with barium).


ALL EXAMS REQUIRE A WRITTEN ORDER FROM A PHYSICIAN. WE WILL ACCEPT ORDERS FROM PHYSICIANS IN GOOD STANDING AND LICENSED TO PRACTICE MEDICINE IN THE STATES OF KANSAS AND OKLAHOMA.